NCO Journal December 2014 Articles

The official magazine of noncommissioned officer professional development

NCOs Help AMEDD Flight Paramedic Program Get Off the Ground

By Pablo Villa - NCO Journal

Medical and technological advances have given modern-day Soldiers who have been injured on the battlefield access to an elite level of immediate trauma care from their fellow Army physicians and combat medics. But the trek from the battlefield to the next round of care has been a perilous journey — the injured Soldier is typically extricated from harm’s way and into an aircraft, but often without a doctor present and with fewer resources onboard. A 2012 study of 4,600 deaths in Iraq and Afghanistan showed that 87.3 percent of Soldiers died while en route to a military treatment facility.

Article published on: December 16, 2014


U.S. Army Africa CSM: NCOs Are the Ones Keeping Soldiers Safe on Ebola Mission

By Meghan Portillo - NCO Journal

From designing and building Ebola Treatment Units to providing transportation to health care workers, NCOs have proven to be instrumental in the U.S. military’s support of Operation United Assistance in Liberia, said the command sergeant major of U.S. Army Africa, Command Sgt. Maj. Jeffery Stitzel. But their greatest contribution, he said, has been keeping U.S. Soldiers healthy by enforcing standards and discipline.

Article published on: December 9, 2014


Amputee Rises to Challenge, Earns Airborne Wings

By SGT. 1st Class Raymond J. Piper - USAMU Public Affairs

A U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit NCO became the first Soldier with a lower-leg amputation to successfully earn his Airborne wings. Sgt. Joseph Mille, a member of the USAMU Paralympic Team, graduated Nov. 14, from the Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning, Ga. Sgt. Joseph Mille, a U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit shooter/instructor, graduated Nov. 14, 2014, from the Basic Airborne Course at Fort Benning, Ga.

Article published on: December 8, 2014


ARCENT NCOs Building Relationships with Officers, Other Branches and Other Countries

By Michael L. Lewis - NCO Journal

Though there are hot spots throughout the globe, U.S. Central Command’s area of responsibility — the Middle East — has been the locale for several spots that, during the past 13 years, have been hotter than most. Supporting the land forces in the region is U.S. Army Central, commonly known as ARCENT, whose headquarters at Shaw Air Force Base, S.C., includes NCOs who are expected to be strategic thinkers capable of working alongside officers, be subject-matter experts able to deploy temporarily when needed downrange and be able to build relationships with members of other U.S. military branches and the militaries of other countries.

Article published on: December 2, 2014