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NCO Journal October 2017 Articles

The official magazine of noncommissioned officer professional development

Inspiring Leadership

By Master Sgt. Michael M. Brosch
Published in From One Leader to Another Volume II by the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in 2015

A Soldier can spend his or her entire military career never finding that one truly inspiring mentor whose leadership style is both inspirational and motivating. However, military personnel with the good fortune of working under these inspiring leaders often attribute their personal success to these transformational leaders.

Article published on: Oct. 30, 2017


Handling Toxic Leadership

By William LaFalce
NCO Journal

The Army is an organization of values and its leaders accept the responsibility to develop and lead others to achieve results. When a leader’s personal values and outcomes override the needs of the Army and its Soldiers, then the climate becomes toxic.

Article published on: Oct. 25, 2017


The Ineffectiveness of the Total Army Sponsorship Program

By Master Sgt. Scott J. Feldt
2nd Infantry Division, Camp Humphreys, South Korea

The Total Army Sponsorship Program is designed to support newly assigned personnel moving from one military installation to another, however, Soldiers are negatively affected by its ineffectiveness.

Article published on: Oct. 23, 2017


Corrective Training

By 1st Sgt. Jorge A. Rivera
Published in From One Leader to Another Volume II by the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College in 2015

When Soldiers do not perform to standard, they should be reminded of the established standard and afforded an opportunity to demonstrate understanding and compliance through corrective training.

Article published on: Oct. 20, 2017


History of the NCO Corps
The American Revolution and the NCO Tradition

By Dr. Robert H. Bouilly
Former NCO Historian for the U.S. Army Sergeants Major Academy
Published in the first edition of the NCO Journal (Spring 1991)

A distinctive American tradition of NCO leadership was established during the Revolutionary War. Begun in the colonial militia, developed during the war, and codified in Baron von Steuben's Blue Book, the distinctive NCO tradition was in place for the Army of a new nation.

Article published on: Oct. 16, 2017


The Stripes You Wear

By Command Sgt. Maj. John L. Murray
U.S. Army Contracting Command
Published in From One Leader to Another by the Combat Studies Institute in 2013

The NCO Corps has and will always be an important part of the U.S. Army and is integral to the success of its missions and daily operation. NCOs are supposed to be the example for others to follow. Sometimes, once we are selected for promotion or an increased position, we forget about the simple things that made us and our formations successful. This article identifies a few key points that NCOs should remember regardless of grade or position.

Article published on: Oct. 13, 2017


SMA Dailey’s Book Club: Start with Why

By Crystal Bradshaw
NCO Journal

Start with Why by Simon Sinek, the most recent book on Dailey’s Book Club list, is open for discussion from July to December 2017. Though not military based, the book covers many leadership aspects beneficial to noncommissioned officers.

Article published on: Oct. 11, 2017


Genuine Leadership: Getting back to the Basics

By Command Sgt. Maj. Ronald Riling, U.S. Army Materiel Command
Published in From One Leader to Another by the Combat Studies Institute in 2013

While the Army has made significant changes over its [242] year history, some things never change. The fundamentals of a good leader have remained steadfast over the past few centuries. As Non-commissioned Officers, we owe it to our peers and our subordinates to be the best leaders we can be.

Article published on: Oct. 9, 2017


Problem-Solving

By Command Sgt. Maj. Craig T. Lott, U.S. Training and Doctrine Command, Retention Branch
Published in From One Leader to Another by the Combat Studies Institute in 2013

In today’s global and highly competitive world, it is vitally important to understand the intellectual principles of problem-solving. Problem-solving deals with understanding simple to complex problems, analyzing them, and then coming up with viable solutions. Intellect deals with the capacity to use knowledge and understanding in order to meet a desired result or purpose.

Article published on: Oct. 6, 2017


Leader-Development

By Command Sgt. Maj. Joe B. Parson, Combined Arms Center, Leader Development and Education
Published in From One Leader to Another by the Combat Studies Institute in 2013

From the birth of our Nation and establishment of the Continental Army there have always been Non-commissioned Officers. Leaders within our ranks, who are charged with the day-to-day activities that maintain good order and discipline, generate readiness, conduct training, and ensure the health and welfare of the force and carryout a myriad of other duties and responsibilities essential to the success of an organization, our Army and ultimately our Nation. In 1779, Inspector General Friedrich von Steuben formally standardized NCO duties and responsibilities when he published “Regulations for the Order and Discipline of the Troops of the United States.” leaders and their subordinates understand their roles in developing solutions to problems which are mutually beneficial.

Article published on: Oct. 3, 2017


Interpersonal Communication

By Command Sgt. Maj. James VanSciver, 500th Military Intelligence Brigade
Published in From One Leader to Another by the Combat Studies Institute in 2013

Interpersonal skills are extremely important as they directly contribute to the leadership competency of leads and more specifically, communicates. Maintaining effective interpersonal communications skills ensures that leaders and their subordinates understand their roles in developing solutions to problems which are mutually beneficial.

Article published on: Oct. 2, 2017