A military government “spearhead” (I Detachment) of the 3rd U.S. Army answers German civilian questions in April 1945 at an outdoor office in the town square of Schlesingen ,Germany. I Detachments moved in the wake of division advances to immediately begin the process of civilian stabilization and normalization. (Photo from book, The U.S. Army in the Occupation of Germany 1944-1946, by Earl F. Ziemke)

A military government “spearhead” (I Detachment) of the 3rd U.S. Army answers German civilian questions in April 1945 at an outdoor office in the town square of Schlesingen, Germany. I Detachments moved in the wake of division advances to immediately begin the process of civilian stabilization and normalization. (Photo from book, The U.S. Army in the Occupation of Germany 1944-1946, by Earl F. Ziemke)

Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Email App

Victory Into Success

Consolidating Gains in Large-Scale Combat Operations

Call for Papers

As part of its Large-Scale Combat Operations series, Army University Press plans to publish a volume of chapter-length historical case studies on how military forces have attempted to consolidate tactical gains to achieve enduring positive political and strategic outcomes. In 2017, the US Army’s Field Manual (FM) 3-0, Operations, addressed consolidating gains in its operational framework and in the context of the Army’s strategic roles. The manual characterized these operations as integral to the realization of lasting success in the achievement of the “higher political purpose” of all joint or multinational military operations.*

According to FM 3-0, Army forces consolidate gains in areas of operations where large-scale combat has ceased, even though it may continue elsewhere within the theater. Operations to consolidate gains consist of decisive actions including, but not limited to, offensive, defensive, and stability tasks that destroy or defeat bypassed and irregular forces; secure lines of communication and population centers; process prisoners of war and detainees; control communications nodes and other key infrastructure; establish legitimate authority in post-conflict areas; and provide humanitarian assistance. The successful planning and execution of these activities has historically led to both relatively stable post-conflict environments and endstates closely aligned with policy objectives.

We anticipate chapters in this collection to range in length from 3500 - 5000 words, including endnotes and images. Submissions should follow conventions of American English and Chicago Manual of Style Guidelines.

Chapter proposals/abstracts due: 15 MAR 2019

Completed Chapters will be due by: 1 OCT 2020

Potential Topics Include:

  • US Army in the Philippines, 1899-1900
  • Allied forces in North Africa, Sicily, or Italy, 1943-44
  • Securing Lines of Communication during Operation Market-Garden
  • US forces in the Philippines, 1945
  • US forces in Kuwait after Operation Desert Storm
  • Afghanistan in 2001/2002 after Coalition forces toppled Taliban government
  • Coalition forces in Iraq 2003, during and immediately following initial offensive operations
  • History of consolidation of gains in operational planning, to include preparations for force-flow that include units designated for these activities.

To propose a topic or request more information, please contact Army University Press.

Submit a Proposal or Request Information Here

Project Timeline

15 March 2020 - Provide a single-page proposal and a CV or resume

15 April 2020 - Authors selected/notified

1 October 2020 - Comleted draft chapters due

*Field Manual (FM) 3-0, Operations available at: https://armypubs.army.mil/ProductMaps/PubForm/Details.aspx?PUB_ID=1003121