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Dealing with Domestic Civil Unrest
 
 
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Dealing with Domestic Civil Unrest

This compilation of works consists mainly of articles from Military Review, publications authored by the Combat Studies Institute, monographs from students at the Command and General Staff College, and selected works from other sources for which we have permission to reproduce.

The Army University Press invites readers to submit for publishing consideration articles to Military Review or longer works to the Combat Studies Institute on issues related to Coups and Color Revolutions for submission on the Army University Press website at http://www.armyupress.army.mil/Publish-With-Us/.


 

 

Army U Press Content

Military Assistance in Los Angeles

Military Assistance in Los Angeles

By Major General James D. Delk, Army of the United States, Retired

That was the environment when the Rodney King verdict was announced on 29 April 1992. Riots erupted, and shortly after 9:00 p.m., the first 2,000 California Army National Guard (CAARNG) soldiers were requested by the governor.

Published by Military Review September 1992, pg 13

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Riot Control Doctrine

Of Strong Men and Straw Men

Riot Control Doctrine

By Major John K. Stoner, Jr., United States Army

In recent years, the frequency of civil disturbances in which military forces have been committed has been on the increase.

Published by Military Review February 1965, pg 40

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Additional Resources

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40th ID: The history of the ‘Sunshine’ Division For nearly 100 years, the Sunshine Division has protected California and the nation

40th ID: The history of the ‘Sunshine’ Division

For nearly 100 years, the Sunshine Division has protected California and the nation

By Major General James D. Delk, Army of the United States, Retired

“All the people thought we were going to kill them. But the minute the division got involved and was on the ground, everything ceased. I witnessed it; I was there. Everything ceased. There was no more violence.

Published by NCO Journal January 2013

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The Posse Comitatus Act and the United States Army: A Historical Perspective

The Posse Comitatus Act and the United States Army: A Historical Perspective

By Matt Matthews

Anytime the use of US Armed Forces in support of civil authorities is considered, government and military leaders, pundits, and citizens reflexively turn to the Posse Comitatus Act for guidance.

Published by Combat Studies Institute Press 2006

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MOUT: A Domestic Case Study—The 1992 Los Angeles Riots

MOUT: A Domestic Case Study—The 1992 Los Angeles Riots

By MG James Delk, CAARNG (Ret.)

General Delk’s presentation began with a videotape clip of commercial television news segments, announcing the results of the trial in Simi Valley, California, in which Los Angeles policemen were found not guilty of assaulting Rodney King.

Published by RAND Corporation, 15 November 1995

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Support to Domestic Civil Authorities in Civil Disturbance Operations:  Intelligence Requirements and Doctrine

Support to Domestic Civil Authorities in Civil Disturbance Operations:

Intelligence Requirements and Doctrine

By Major Steven W. Peterson, Military Intelligence

The focus of this study will be primarily on the role of federal troops--Regular Army and federalized National Guard--during the unrest in Washington, D.C., immediately following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on 4 April 1968.

Published by School of Advanced Military Studies United States Army Command and General Staff College, 20 September 1994

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The Use of Federal Troops In Quelling Civil Unrest

The Use of Federal Troops In Quelling Civil Unrest

By Barrye La Troye Price

The focus of this study will be primarily on the role of federal troops--Regular Army and federalized National Guard--during the unrest in Washington, D.C., immediately following the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., on 4 April 1968.

Published by Texas A&M University, May 1994

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 A Study of the Need for Arrest Powers by Federal Troops Performing Civil Disturbance Missions

A Study of the Need for Arrest Powers by Federal Troops Performing Civil Disturbance Missions

 

By David H. Stem, Major, USA

The question of employing Federal troops in domestic situations has both political and legal implications. The Constitution gives the President power to use troops in support of controlling domestic disturbances. Title 10, U. S. Code specifies three main prerequisites for Federal intervention in local disorders: at the request of appropriate state authorities; when states are unable to maintain order; or when states are unwilling to enforce the law.

Published by U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 29 October 1970

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FINAL REPORT of Cyrus R. Vance Special Assistant to The Secretary of Defense Concerning the Detroit Riots July 23 through August 2, 1967

FINAL REPORT of Cyrus R. Vance Special Assistant to The Secretary of Defense

Concerning the Detroit Riots July 23 through August 2, 1967

By Cyrus R. Vance, Special Assistant to The Secretary of Defense

This report Covers the Federal activities connected with the riots in Detroit, Michigan, during the period 23 July through 2 August 1967. Its purpose is to recount the sequence of events, to summarize the experience gained, and to focus upon the problems encountered, both resolved and unresolved, for consideration in planning for or conducting future operations of a similar nature.

Published by Office of Special Assistant to The Secretary of Defense (Public Affairs), 12 September 1967

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