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Tribalism

This compilation of works consists mainly of articles from Military Review, publications authored by the Combat Studies Institute, monographs from students at the Command and General Staff College, and selected works from other sources for which we have permission to reproduce.

The Army University Press invites readers to submit for publishing consideration articles to Military Review or longer works to the Combat Studies Institute on issues related to Russia. Guidelines for submission are on the Army University Press website at http://www.armyupress.army.mil/Publish-With-Us/.


Army U Press Content

Western Anbar after the Awakening A Tale of Three Cities

Western Anbar after the Awakening

A Tale of Three Cities

Maj. Michael W. Hein, U.S. Army

The period of five years following the Anbar Awakening offers important lessons and highlights potential consequences for a tribe-based counterinsurgency strategy.

Published in the March-April 2018 Edition of Military Review, p 108.

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The Role of Iraqi Tribes after the Islamic State’s Ascendance

The Role of Iraqi Tribes after the Islamic State’s Ascendance

Daveed Gartenstein-Ross, PhD, and
Sterling Jensen, PhD

Appreciation for the Anbar Awakening’s context will assist the understanding of a major event in the history of recent warfare, counterterrorism, and counterinsurgency.

Published in the Jult-August 2015 Edition of Military Review, p 102.

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The Anbar Awakening in Context … and Why It Is so Hard to Replicate

The Anbar Awakening in Context … and Why It Is so Hard to Replicate

Matthew T. Penney, Ph.D.

Appreciation for the Anbar Awakening’s context will assist the understanding of a major event in the history of recent warfare, counterterrorism, and counterinsurgency.

Published in the March-April 2015 Edition of Military Review, p 106.

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Additional Resources

Are Our Politics Really “Tribal”?

Lawrence Rosen

Amy Chua’s new book mischaracterizes American politics and perpetuates stereotypes of tribal societies. Political Tribes: Group Instinct and the Fate of Nations
Amy Chua
Penguin Press, 2018, 304 pp.

Published by The American Interest, 2010.

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Constraints on the evolution of social institutions and their implications for information flow

Constraints on the evolution of social institutions and their implications for information flow

By R. I. M. Dunbar

Human communities and ego-centric social networks have a distinct size that reflects a generic relationship between relative neocortex volume and social group size that is characteristic of primates in general (the ‘social brain hypothesis’). Human networks are structured into layers that reflect both differences in the frequency of contact and levels of emotional closeness. The rate of decay in the frequency of contact across network layers is very steep, and we might expect this to have a very significant effect on the likelihood of Ego finding out some novel fact when information flow is limited to face-to-face interaction. I use an analytical model parameterized by these contact frequencies to show that there may be little advantage in having a network larger than ~150 for the purposes of information exchange. I then present a Monte Carlo simulation model to show that structure significantly impedes the rate of information flow in structured communities.

Published by The JOIE Foundation, 2010.

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