Counterinsurgency/Stability Operations


Art of War Papers: Instilling Aggressiveness

Art of War Papers:

Instilling Aggressiveness

William D Harris, Jr. MAJ, US Army

138 Pages

Published: 2013

In March 1947, the United States established an economic and military assistance program to bolster the nationalist Greek government against a communist insurgency. The Greek government suffered from a collapsed economy, deep social divisions, and an inability to defeat the insurgents in battle. The Joint US Military Advisory and Planning Group provided operational advice to the Greek National Army that improved the nationalists’ aggressiveness, tactics, battlefield management, and logistics. The advisors used training, mentorship, directive control, and disciplinary action to affect the nationalists’ combat leadership.

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Art of War Papers: Lansdale, Magsaysay, America, and the Philippines

Art of War Papers:

Lansdale, Magsaysay, America, and the Philippines

By Andrew E. Lembke, MAJ, US Army

142 Pages

Published: 2013

Historians tend to agree that Ramon Magsaysay’s leadership and his relationship with Edward Lansdale are two of the most important features of the Philippine governments campaign against the Huks from 1946-1954. Yet the nuances of his leadership and the nature of their relationship deserve greater investigation. This thesis seeks to further illuminate Magsaysay and Lansdale’s relationship by focusing on the role of empathy and sociocultural understanding, in defeating the Huks and restoring the Philippine government’s legitimacy. US policy in the Philippines at the time, bolstered regimes riddled with corruption, graft, and nepotism, reinforcing poor governance, and resulting in a loss of government legitimacy.

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Art of War Papers: United States’ Grand Strategy Through the Lens of Lebanon in 1983 and Iraq in 2003

Art of War Papers:

United States’ Grand Strategy Through the Lens of Lebanon in 1983 and Iraq in 2003

By Charles P. Bris-Bois III, MAJ, US Air Force

103 Pages

Published: 2013

The United States failed in both Lebanon in 1982-1984 and Iraq in 2003, to achieve its political objectives. While there are many reasons for this, perhaps the greatest is that the government failed to coordinate and direct all of its resources in a unified manner to achieve its goals. This book outlines four key indicators, present in both Lebanon and Iraq, that suggest the United States did not have a grand strategy. Further, this book reveals that Lebanon and Iraq are not anomalies; there are both historical and structural reasons why the United States struggles to implement grand strategies.

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Armed Peacekeepers in Bosnia

Armed Peacekeepers in Bosnia

By Robert F. Baumann, George Gawrych and Walter Kretchik

250 Pages

Published: 2004

By 1990, the Cold War was over and many Americans talked of the “peace dividend” that would befall the country once military spending and commitments could be reduced in what some referred to as the New World Order. Instead, world affairs proved as dangerous and intractable as ever, even more so perhaps than during the period 1945-1990 when the two competing superpowers managed to hold various tribal, ethnic, religious, and political conflicts around the world somewhat in check.

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Art of War Papers: Closing the Security Gap

Art of War Papers:

Closing the Security Gap

Michael J. Gunther, MAJ, US Army

144 Pages

Published: 2012

The British and US experience with the use of local, irregular security forces suggest their importance in assisting the host nation government and counterinsurgent forces. Their successful establishment, training, and employment demonstrate the importance of several prerequisites including partnership with an advisory force, consent of the host nation’s government to exist, and that the security force is accountable to the local civil authority. Without these prerequisites, the local, irregular security force could risk illegitimacy in the eyes of the populace, the host nation government, and the counterinsurgent.

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Art of War Papers: Stabilizing the Debate between Population and Enemy-Centric Counterinsurgency Success Demands a Balanced Approach

Art of War Papers:

Stabilizing the Debate between Population and Enemy-Centric Counterinsurgency Success Demands a Balanced Approach

By Nathan Ray Springer, MAJ, US Army

150 Pages

Published: 2012

This thesis contends the debate on whether to embrace a population-centric or enemy-centric counterinsurgency strategy in Afghanistan detracts focus from building a balanced approach, customized for the human and political landscape in each area of operation (AO). The debate should be finally resolved since each strategic axis represents a crucial portion of the ideal hybrid approach, which necessarily looks different from one AO to the next.

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Art Of War Papers: The Rhodesian African Rifles

Art of War Papers:

The Rhodesian African Rifles

By MAJ Michael P. Stewart

138 Pages

Published: 2012

The Rhodesian African Rifles overcame profoundly divisive racial and tribal differences among its members because a transcendent “regimental culture” superseded the disparate cultures of its individual soldiers and officers. The RAR’s culture grew around the traditions of the British regimental system, after which the RAR was patterned. The soldiers of the RAR, regardless of racial or tribal background, identified themselves first as soldiers and members of the regiment, before their individual race and tribe. Regimental history and traditions, as well as shared hardships on deployments and training were mechanisms that forced officers and soldiers to see past differences.

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Art of War Papers: The Biggest Stick - The Employment of Artillery Units in Counterinsurgency

Art of War Papers:

The Biggest Stick - The Employment of Artillery Units in Counterinsurgency

By Richard B. Johnson, MAJ, US Army

229 Pages

Published: 2012

This study uses a comparative analysis of the Malayan Emergency, the American experience in Vietnam, and Operation IRAQI FREEDOM to examine the role and effectiveness of artillery units in complex counterinsurgency environments. Through this analysis, four factors emerge which impact the employment of artillery units: the counterinsurgency effort’s requirement for indirect fires; constraints and limitations on indirect fires; the counterinsurgency effort’s force organization; and the conversion cost of nonstandard roles for artillery units.

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Art of War Papers: Key Considerations for Irregular Security Forces in Counterinsurgency

Art of War Papers:

Key Considerations for Irregular Security Forces in Counterinsurgency

By Robert L. Green, MAJ, US Army

150 Pages

Published: 2012

Counterinsurgents have raised and employed irregular security forces in many campaigns over the last century. Irregular security forces are indigenous forces, not part of the regular police or military organizations of the host nation, that are recruited locally to provide a basic level of security in a given area. Irregular security forces, when used in conjunction with all other available capabilities, contribute to, but do not in and of themselves, ensure success. While irregular security forces can be effective in conducting local security, intelligence gathering, surveillance and other tasks in their home areas, tasks that may prove more difficult for regular security forces, irregular forces are no silver bullet to achieving success.

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Art of War Papers: Operations at the Border

Art of War Papers:

Operations at the Border

By Eric Hunter Haas, MAJ, US Army

134 Pages

Published: 2012

Disrupting an insurgent’s access to sanctuary and safe-haven is a critical aspect of operational planning for counterinsurgent forces. By denying an insurgent’s access to safe-havens early in the conflict, the counterinsurgent will gain a marked advantage over the initially weaker force. Only through a deep understanding of how the insurgent is using international, tribal, or cultural borders to evade the counterinsurgent force can the counterinsurgent disrupt the insurgent operations. In order to accomplish this, the counterinsurgent must understand the physical terrain and cultural demographics, nest border operations into the overarching strategy, and employ security forces to reinforce success.

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Art of War Papers: Orde Wingate And the British Internal Security Strategy During the Arab Rebellion in Palestine, 1936-1939

Art of War Papers:

Orde Wingate And the British Internal Security Strategy During the Arab Rebellion in Palestine, 1936-1939

By Mark Lehenbauer, MAJ, US Army

108 Pages

Published: 2012

The Arab Rebellion and British Counter-rebellion campaign of 1936 to 1939 in Palestine exhibited many features of modern insurgency and counterinsurgency. This thesis traces the British military thought and practice for countering rebellion as influenced by their Small Wars’ experiences, and it then presents the rebellion and counter-rebellion campaign as a case study in their military and political contexts. This study focuses on the evolution of the internal security strategy, and it examines the actions of Captain Orde Wingate both within the campaign and in his attempts to influence it at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels.

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Art of War Papers: Protecting, Isolating, and Controlling Behavior

Art of War Papers:

Protecting, Isolating, and Controlling Behavior

By Mark E. Battjes, MAJ, US Army

292 Pages

Published: 2012

The classical counterinsurgency theorists emphasize that it is necessary for the government to gain and maintain control of the population in order to defeat the insurgency. They describe population and resource control measures as a means of doing so. However, some contemporary writers have questioned the legitimacy of such tactics and doubt that they can be employed effectively in modern campaigns.

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Art Of War Papers: Survival Through Adaptation - The Chinese Red Army and the Extermination Campaigns, 1927-1936

Art of War Papers:

Survival Through Adaptation - The Chinese Red Army and the Extermination Campaigns, 1927-1936

By Wilbur W. Hsu, MAJ, US Army

196 Pages

Published: 2012

This study analyzes the Chinese Red Army from 1927 to 1936 to determine how the Red Army survived attacks from external military forces and also successfully overcame the threats to its existence posed by changing Chinese Communist Party (CCP) policies. During this period, the CCP attempted to develop, expand, and professionalize the Chinese Red Army as a way to defend Communist base areas from a series of Kuomingtang (KMT) Extermination Campaigns.

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Back to Basics: A Study of the Second Lebanon War and Operation CAST LEAD

Back to Basics:

A Study of the Second Lebanon War and Operation CAST LEAD

By Lieutenant Colonel Scott C. Farquhar (Gen. Ed.)

156 Pages

Published: 2009

The Israeli incursions into Lebanon in mid-2006 and into Gaza in late 2008/early 2009 are important studies in contrasts. During the first, often termed “the Second Lebanon War,” Hezbollah fought Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) seeking hostage rescue and retribution to a bloody standstill. During the second, Hamas enjoyed far less success against the same forces avowedly in pursuit of only self-defense.

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Between the Rivers: Combat Action in Iraq 2003-2005

Between the Rivers: Combat Action in Iraq 2003-2005

By John J. McGrath

142 Pages

Published: 2012

Making history useful to the reader – this is one of the missions of the Combat Studies Institute. We strive to produce works that recount historical events to inform decision makers and to enable experiential learning. This collection of events put together by John McGrath, which occurred in Iraq during the 2003-2005 timeframe, addresses that mission.

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Block by Block: The Challenges of Urban Operations

Block by Block: The Challenges of Urban Operations

By Dr. Lawrence Yates, Dr. W. Glenn Robertson, eds.

481 Pages

Published: 2003

It is axiomatic in the military community that operations in an urban environment should be avoided if at all possible, given the costs they exact in time, personnel, casualties, and materiel. Yet, throughout history, cities have continuously been at the center of a variety of military undertakings: sieges, street fighting, coups de main, peacekeeping and peace enforcement, stability operations and support operations, and disaster and humanitarian relief. Moreover, this trend continues through the recent past and up to the present as headlines concerning Beirut, Sarajevo, Mogadishu, Grozny, Kabul, and Baghdad indicate.

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Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities

Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities

By Kendall D. Gott

146 Pages

Published: 2006

Few lessons are as prevalent in military history as is the adage that tanks don’t perform well in cities. The notion of deliberately committing tanks to urban combat is anathema to most. In Breaking the Mold: Tanks in the Cities, Mr. Ken Gott disproves that notion with a timely series of five case studies from World War II to the present war in Iraq.

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CSI Report No. 15 - UN Peacekeeper in Cambodia, 1991-1992: An Interview with Major George Stueber

CSI Report No. 15 - UN Peacekeeper in Cambodia, 1991-1992:

An Interview with Major George Stueber

By Dr. Jerold E. Brown

26 Pages

Published: 2006

In the wake of the cold war, peacekeeping —or, more appropriately, peace enforcing—is becoming an increasingly important role for military forces around the world. Because of the many other missions it has been responsible for, the U.S. Army has not participated significantly in United Nations peacekeeping missions in the past. That situation will almost certainly change in the future. Indeed, President George Bush's December 1992 decision to commit U.S. forces to a humanitarian peacekeeping role in Somalia may be indicative of the future use of our military forces.

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Rapid Deployment Logistics: Lebanon, 1958

Rapid Deployment Logistics:

Lebanon, 1958

By Lieutenant Colonel Gary H. Wade

131 Pages

Published: 1985

The countries of the Middle East experienced intermittent crises during the 1950s. Lebanon was no exception, as internal turmoil and outside pressures threatened its existence. This research survey, however, will not dwell on the political situation of either the entire Middle East or, specifically, Lebanon in the spring of 1958.1 Suffice it to say, President Camille Chamoun of Lebanon made an urgent plea on 14 July 1958 to the governments of France, Great Britain, and the United States to deploy military forces to Lebanon to stabilize the situation. Received .in Washington at 0600 on 14 July, this message became the first test of the Eisenhower Doctrine, which had been announced in January 1957.

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From One Leader to Another

From One Leader to Another

By CSM Joe B. Parson (Gen. Ed.)

404 Pages

Published: 2013

This work is a collection of observations, insights, and advice from over 50 serving and retired Senior Non-Commissioned Officers. These experienced Army leaders have provided for the reader, outstanding mentorship on leadership skills, tasks, and responsibilities relevant to our Army today. There is much wisdom and advice “from one leader to another” in the following pages. CSI - The Past is Prologue!

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From One Leader to Another

From One Leader to Another Vol II

By CSM Joe B. Parson (Gen. Ed.)

322 Pages

Published: 2014

This outstanding resource contains a wealth of knowledge from some of the most experienced Non-Commissioned Officers from across our Army. Every NCO can learn important lessons from fellow NCOs and I encourage you to pass on that knowledge to your Soldiers.

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From One Leader to Another

Invasion, Intervention, "Intervasion":

A Concise History of the U.S. Army in Operation Uphold Democracy

By Walter Kretchik and Robert F. Baumann

267 Pages

Published: 1997

In September 1994, U.S. military forces were ordered to execute Operation Uphold Democracy in Haiti. The stated objectives of that undertaking included the return to office of the democratically elected president of that country and the creation of a stable and secure environment in which democratic institutions could take hold. In the short term, these objectives were met: President Aristide reassumed his duties as president, the junta that had ousted him in 1991 was forced to leave the country, and national elections were successfully held in 1996.

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Leavenworth Papers No. 3 Not War, But Like War. The American Intervention in Lebanon

Leavenworth Papers No. 3

Not War, But Like War. The American Intervention in Lebanon

By Roger J. Spiller

65 Pages

Published: 1997

The study that follows began in August 1979 as a series of notes for a lecture on the employment of contingency forces at the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. The lecture was intended to serve as a historical introduction to the subject, using the 1958 American intervention in Lebanon as a case in point. It was thought that by analyzing the Lebanon intervention one could demonstrate several important lessons: how political and diplomatic objectives directly affect the character of modern military operations; how an operational military plan is conceived and what evolutions it endures before it is executed; how such plans, though they appear to anticipate every operational problem, are usually unequal to the realities of operational practice; and,finally...

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Leavenworth Papers No. 14 Dragon Operations: Hostage Rescues in the Congo 1964 - 1965

Leavenworth Papers No. 14

Dragon Operations: Hostage Rescues in the Congo 1964 - 1965

By MAJ Thomas P. Odom

238 Pages

Published: 1988

Leavenworth Paper No. 14, Dragon Operations: Hostage Rescues in the Congo, 1964-1965 is a useful historical analysis of a cold war crisis, the resolution of which depended upon the planning and execution of joint and combined military operations. It shows how combatants react to the pressures and uncertainties associated with a rapidly changing situation in a highly politicized arena.

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Leavenworth Papers No. 15 Power Pack: U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965 – 1966

Leavenworth Papers No. 15 Power Pack:

U.S. Intervention in the Dominican Republic, 1965 – 1966

By Dr. Lawrence A. Yates

242 Pages

Published: 1988

In the early 1960s, President John F. Kennedy expressed concern that Communist-sponsored unconventional warfare was one of the most pervasive threats to American security and that the U.S. military establishment was inadequately prepared to counter the threat. To correct this deficiency, the White House put pressure on the services, especially the U.S. Army, to develop the doctrine and forces necessary to conduct what was variously called counterinsurgency, counterguerrilla warfare, special warfare, special operations, or stability operations. As the military's capability to engage in unconventional warfare grew, so, too, did the opportunities to translate this capability into action. One such opportunity was the crisis in the Dominican Republic in 1965.

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Modern Warfare: A French View of Counterinsurgency

Modern Warfare:

A French View of Counterinsurgency

By Roger Trinquier

131 Pages

Published: 1985

In a book that became one of France's greatest best sellers since World War II, Jean Lart6guy gave the name of "centurion" to the hard-bitten French regular who had survived the Indochina war, had learned his Mao Tse-tung the hard way, and later had sought to apply his lessons in Algeria or even in mainland France.

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My Clan Against the World: US and Coalition Forces in Somalia, 1992-1994

My Clan Against the World:

US and Coalition Forces in Somalia, 1992-1994

By Robert Baumann, Larry Yates, Versalle F. Washington

233 Pages

Published: 2003

“My Clan Against the World”: US and Coalition Operations in Somalia, 1992-94 represents another in a series of military case studies published by the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. The impetus for this project came from the commanding general, US Army Training and Doctrine Command, Fort Monroe, Virginia, who directed CSI to examine the American military’s experience with urban operations in Somalia, particularly in the capital city of Mogadishu.

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Occasional Paper 1 Traditions, Changes, and Challenges: Military Operations and the Middle Eastern City

Occasional Paper 1 Traditions, Changes, and Challenges: Military Operations and the Middle Eastern City

By Louis A. DiMarco

81 Pages

Published: 2004

The Middle East is one of the most urbanized regions of the world, and growth continues at an unprecedented rate. With operations ongoing in the Middle East today, it is fitting that this inaugural study should focus on military aspects of the urban areas of that region. There is an undoubted need for US military planners to possess a solid foundation of military history, cultural awareness, and an understanding of the intricacies of city design and function in this critical region. Each conflict brings its own challenges and dynamics. The challenges of a Middle Eastern fight require decisive involvement in that region’s cities. The enemy is adaptive—we must be adaptive as well. This call to study and understand history and culture is the first step along that road to critical thinking and adaptability.

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Occasional Paper 4 Field Artillery in Military Operations Other than War: An Overview of the US Experience

Occasional Paper 4 Field Artillery in Military Operations Other than War: An Overview of the US Experience

By Lawrence A. Yates

55 Pages

Published: 2004

The initial conflicts in the Global War on Terrorism, Afghanistan and Iraq, pose significant challenges for the armed forces of the United States and its coalition allies. Among the challenges is the use of field artillery in those campaigns that fall short of conventional warfare. Engaged in a spectrum from full-scale combat to stability and support operations, the military is faced with an ever-changing environment in which to use its combat power. For instance, it is axiomatic that the massive application of firepower necessary to destroy targets in decisive phase III combat operations is not necessary in phase IV stability operations.

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Occasional Paper 5 In Search of an Elusive Enemy

Occasional Paper 5 In Search of an Elusive Enemy

The Victorio Campaign

By Kendall D. Gott

64 Pages

Published: 2004

In Search of an Elusive Enemy: The Victorio Campaign, 1879-1880 represents another in a series of military case studies published by the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. This work examines the US Army’s efforts in tracking down Victorio, the infamous Apache chief who raided large tracts of New Mexico and Texas at will, terrorizing the entire region. The key point made in this work is that it demonstrates the challenges of tracking and capturing or killing a small, irregular group of warriors in inhospitable terrain and among an alien culture.

Although set in the late 19th century, this case study is still extremely relevant for today’s Army. The commanders of the 9th and 10th US Cavalry Regiments faced a skilled adversary who used unconventional tactics and methods as well as an international border to seek sanctuary. However, it could just as easily have featured the stories of Osceola, Aguinaldo, Pancho Villa, or Osama bin Laden. The similarities to challenges that US and coalition forces face in Afghanistan and Iraq are striking. The commanders of the 19th century faced enormous challenges in the rugged terrain of the American Southwest as well as a skeptical and often hostile press. Again, officers and soldiers who have recently served in Afghanistan and Iraq will certainly see parallels here.

As the US Army continues its efforts in combating terrorists where they live, the lessons found in this narrative are well worth revisiting.

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Occasional Paper 7 Easier Said than Done: Making the Transition between Combat Operations and Stability Operations

Occasional Paper 7 Easier Said than Done: Making the Transition between Combat Operations and Stability Operations

By David P. Cavaleri

105 Pages

Published: 2005

Easier Said Than Done: Making the Transition Between Combat Operations and Stability Operations is another in the Combat Studies Institute’s (CSI) Global War On Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Papers series. The impetus for this series that concerns topics relevant to ongoing and future operations came from the Commanding General, Combined Arms Center and Fort Leavenworth. Lieutenant General William S. Wallace, V Corps commander in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, directed CSI to examine historical topics that would benefit American and coalition soldiers and planners in both Iraq today, and in the broader GWOT spectrum now and in the future.

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Occasional Paper 9 Law of War: Can 20th Century Standards Apply to the Global War on Terrorism?

Occasional Paper 9 Law of War: Can 20th Century Standards Apply to the Global War on Terrorism?

By David P. Cavaleri

119 Pages

Published: 2005

The Law of War: Can 20th-Century Standards Apply to the Global War on Terrorism? is the ninth offering in the Combat Studies Institute’s (CSI) Global War On Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Papers series. Mr. David Cavaleri, a retired Armor lieutenant colonel and CSI historian, has produced a study that examines the evolution and continued applicability of the corpus, both conventional and customary, that constitutes the law of war. As background, Mr. Cavaleri provides a theoretical framework and the development of the law within Western and, specifically, US Army doctrine and regulation. He then presents a case study of the British suppression of the Mau Mau insurgency in 1950s Kenya, a conflict with particular resonance today.

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Occasional Paper 10 Eyes Behind the Lines: US Army Long-Range Reconnaissance and Surveillance Units

Occasional Paper 10 Eyes Behind the Lines: US Army Long-Range Reconnaissance and Surveillance Units?

By James F. Gebhardt

187 Pages

Published: 2005

Eyes Behind the Lines: US Army Long-Range Reconnaissance and Surveillance Units is the 10th study in the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Paper series. This work is an outgrowth of concerns identified by the authors of On Point: The United States Army in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM. Specifically, these authors called into question the use of long-range surveillance (LRS) assets by commanders during that campaign and suggested an assessment ought to be made about their continuing utility and means of employment.

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Occasional Paper 11 Mobility, Vigilance, and Justice: The US Army Constabulary in Germany, 1946-1953

Occasional Paper 11 Mobility, Vigilance, and Justice: The US Army Constabulary in Germany, 1946-1953

By Kendall D. Gott

88 Pages

Published: 2005

Mobility, Vigilance, and Justice: The US Army Constabulary in Germany, 1946-1953 is another in a series of military case studies published by the Combat Studies Institute at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. This work examines the establishment and operations of the US Constabulary in post-World War II Germany. It outlines the planning involved in the early stages and showcases some of the difficulties involved with implementing the command guidance.

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Circle the Wagons: The History of US Army Convoy Security

Circle the Wagons: The History of US Army Convoy Security

By Richard E. Killblane

97 Pages

Published: 2005

Circle the Wagons: The History of US Army Convoy Security is the 13th study in the Combat Studies Institute (CSI) Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Papers series. Transportation Corps Historian Richard Killblane’s manuscript on convoy security is another case study modern military professionals can use to prepare themselves and their soldiers for operations in the current conflict.

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Occasional Paper 15 - The US Military’s Experience in Stability Operations,1789-2005

Occasional Paper 15 - The US Military’s Experience in Stability Operations,1789-2005

By Lawrence A. Yates

108 Pages

Published: 2006

This Global War on Terrorism Occasional Paper (GWOT OP), by Dr. Lawrence Yates, provides his thoughts and analysis of the US Army’s participation in stability operations (SO) since 1789. Dr. Yates, a member of the CSI Team since 1981, has spent twenty plus years intensely studying this aspect of Army operations. Prior to his retirement in 2005, CSI asked him to put in writing his impressions formed by his research in this field.

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Occasional Paper 17 - Out of Bounds: Transnational Sanctuary in Irregular Warfare

Occasional Paper 17 - Out of Bounds: Transnational Sanctuary in Irregular Warfare

By Thomas A. Bruscino, Jr.

122 Pages

Published: 2006

In this timely Occasional Paper, Dr. Tom Bruscino analyzes a critical issue in the GWOT, and one which has bedeviled counterinsurgents past and present. He examines the role played by sanctuaries as they relate to irregular warfare in two conflicts. An active sanctuary refers to the practice of using territory outside the geographical limits of an irregular war to provide various forms of support to one side, usually the insurgent or guerrilla force.

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Occasional Paper 18 - Advising Indigenous Forces: American Advisors in Korea, Vietnam, and El Salvador

Occasional Paper 18 - Advising Indigenous Forces: American Advisors in Korea, Vietnam, and El Salvador

By Robert Ramsey III

187 Pages

Published: 2006

It has been said that the only thing new in the world is the history you don’t know. This Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Paper (OP) is a timely reminder for the US Army about the history we do not know, or at least the history we do not know well. The Army has recently embarked on massive advisory missions with foreign militaries in Iraq, Afghanistan, and elsewhere around the globe.

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Occasional Paper 19 - Advice for Advisors: Suggestions and Observations from Lawrence to the Present

Occasional Paper 19 - Advice for Advisors: Suggestions and Observations from Lawrence to the Present

By Robert Ramsey III

191 Pages

Published: 2006

CSI Global War on Terrorism (GWOT) Occasional Paper (OP) 19, Advice for Advisors: Suggestions and Observations from Lawrence to the Present, could not be timelier. While always a mission for some Army units, advising indigenous forces has become a major task for many Army units and for thousands of Soldiers, both Active and Reserve.

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Occasional Paper 21 - Flipside of the COIN: Israel's Lebanese Incursion Between 1982-2000

Occasional Paper 21 - Flipside of the COIN: Israel's Lebanese Incursion Between 1982-2000

By Daniel Isaac Helmer

122 Pages

Published: 2007

In view of the adoption of the term “The Long War” by the United States Joint Chiefs of Staff to describe US operations against terrorism and state sponsored terrorism, we have decided to change the title of our long running series of studies on irregular warfare – from the Global War on Terrorism Occasional Papers to the Long War Occasional Papers.

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Occasional Paper 22 The US Army on the Mexican Border

Occasional Paper 22 The US Army on the Mexican Border

By Matt M. Matthews

110 Pages

Published: 2007

Since the mid-19th century, the United States has frequently employed the US Army on its southern border to perform various roles in support of the Nation—from outright war, to patrolling the border, to chasing bandits while securing persons and property on both sides of the border, and most recently to supporting civil law enforcement and antidrug efforts. Events since 9/11, such as the recent deployment of National Guard Soldiers to the Mexican border, are only the latest manifestation of this long tradition.

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Occasional Paper 24 Savage Wars of Peace: Case Studies of Pacification in the Philippines, 1900-1902

Occasional Paper 24 Savage Wars of Peace: Case Studies of Pacification in the Philippines, 1900-1902

By Robert Ramsey III

181 Pages

Published: 2007

Consider the following: The United States is engaged in what some political and media leaders call an immoral war, a war that did not have to be fought. After a relatively easy initial conquest, the US Army finds itself faced with armed resistance to US occupation. US strategic goals have changed since the war began; domestic political opposition increases as insurgent activities prolong the war. Insurgent leaders monitor US domestic politics and adjust their strategy accordingly.

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Occasional Paper 25 A Masterpiece of Counterguerrilla Warfare

Occasional Paper 25 A Masterpiece of Counterguerrilla Warfare

By Robert Ramsey III

153 Pages

Published: 2007

Combat Studies Institute (CSI) presents Long War Series Occasional Paper (OP) 25, A Masterpiece of Counterguerrilla Warfare: BG J. Franklin Bell in the Philippines, 1901–1902, by Robert Ramsey. OP 25 is a companion to OP 24, Savage Wars of Peace: Case Studies of Pacification in the Philippines, 1900–1902. In OP 24 Ramsey analyzed case studies from two different Philippine military districts discovering several themes relevant to today’s ongoing operations in the Long War. In OP 25 he focuses on the philosophy that guided Bell in the conduct of one of those campaigns.

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Occasional Paper 28 Military Intervention in Sierra Leone

Occasional Paper 28 Military Intervention in Sierra Leone

By Larry J. Woods and Colonel Timothy R. Reese

129 Pages

Published: 2008

Recognizing the importance of the nations residing on the continent of Africa in an interconnected world, the United States established the United States Africa Command (USAFRICOM) in October 2007. That development alone makes it imperative that American military leaders understand the problems facing many African states today and the conflicts that have ravaged them in the recent past.

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Occasional Paper 30 Searching for Stability

Occasional Paper 30 Searching for Stability

By Dr. Richard L. Millett

154 Pages

Published: 2010

The Combat Studies Institute is pleased to present Occasional Paper 30, Searching for Stability: The US Development of Constabulary Forces in Latin America and the Philippines, by Dr. Richard L. Millett. In this study, Dr. Millett offers a survey of U.S. military involvement in the training of indigenous security forces in the Philippines and the Caribbean Basin in the 20th century.

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Occasional Paper 34 From El Billar to Operations Fenix and Jaque

Occasional Paper 34 From El Billar to Operations Fenix and Jaque

By Robert Ramsey III

206 Pages

Published: 2009

Recent operations in Iraq and Afghanistan have given the US military an appreciation of both the importance and the challenges of working with and through host nation security forces in the aftermath of major combat operations. Secretary of Defense Robert M. Gates has indicated that these types of efforts will be an ongoing military requirement for the foreseeable future.

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Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR: V Corps in Bosnia-Herzegovina 1995-1996

Operation JOINT ENDEAVOR: V Corps in Bosnia-Herzegovina 1995-1996

By Dr. Harold E. Raugh, Jr.

302 Pages

Published: 2010

The Dayton Peace Accords, signed on 14 December 1995, formally ended the ethnic and religious conflict in Bosnia-Herzegovina and established a framework for full implementation of the provisions of the peace settlement.1 The following day, the UNSC (United Nations Security Council) adopted UNSC Resolution 1031, which authorized the NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) “to establish a multinational IFOR (Implementation Force) under unified command and control”2 to help ensure compliance with the provisions of the Dayton Peace Accords.

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Population-Centric Counterinsurgency: A False Idol?

Population-Centric Counterinsurgency: A False Idol?

By Dan G. Cox and Thomas Bruscino (eds.)

139 Pages

Published: 2011

Rarely is it a good idea for any field of human endeavor to be dominated by a single theory aimed at addressing a pressing problem. However, such dominance has recently occurred in the American approach to counterinsurgency warfare. In recent years, driven by the perceived failures in the American war in Iraq, the United States military, and in particular the United States Army, has determined that when it comes to counterinsurgency, the population-centric approach is the only way to go.

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Shaba II: The French and Belgian Intervention in Zaire in 1978

Shaba II: The French and Belgian Intervention in Zaire in 1978

By LTC Thomas P. Odom

103 Pages

Published: 1993

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas P. Odom's study, Shaba II The French and Belgian Intervention in Zaire in 1978, presents a historical analysis of the 1978 invasion of Shaba province by the exiled Katangan Gendarmerie. Included in this study is the Western reaction to the invasion, from the Zairian Army's initial response, which set off the massacre of expatriate mine workers, to the airborne landings of French and Belgian forces.

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Sharp Corners: Urban Operations at Century's End

Sharp Corners: Urban Operations at Century's End

By Roger J. Spiller

158 Pages

Published: 2001

This study was directed by the Commanding General, US Army Training and Doctrine Command, in the summer of 1999. NATO operations against Yugoslavia had just begun. Notwithstanding official announcements that ground forces would not be needed for the time being, expectations ran high that ground troops would ultimately have to be employed. The precise nature of the operations they would be called on to perform could not be foreseen, and consequently neither the size nor the precise character of the forces to be committed could be decided at the time.

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Success in the Shadows: Operation Enduring Freedom–Philippines and the Global War on Terror, 2002–2015

Success in the Shadows

Operation Enduring Freedom–Philippines and the Global War on Terror, 2002–2015

By Barry M. Stentiford

120 Pages

Published: 2018

Written by a reserve officer who spent a tour in the Philippines producing a classified history for US Special Operations Command, this first-ever publicly available history of OEF-P provides both a detailed accounting of the operation’s successes and a model for trainers and advisers providing assistance to host-nation security forces around the globe. Stentiford emphasizes that what made OEF-P a success was an adherence to time-honored principles of counterinsurgency: insisting that host-nation forces take the lead and conducting operations with a minimal footprint that bought the essential time for the mission to succeed. Success in the Shadows is both a fitting tribute to the operators who performed this vital mission and a primer for those who will be called upon to do so in the future.

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CSI Reprint: The U.S. Intervention in Lebanon, 1958

CSI Reprint: The U.S. Intervention in Lebanon, 1958

By MG David W. Gray

60 Pages

Published: 1984

Lebanon was chosen because there was ample documentation, much of it only recently declassified, and because Dr. Roger Spiller had set the strategic and tactical stage in Leavenworth Paper No. 3, "Not War But Like War": The American Intervention in Lebanon. In the course of my investigation, I decided to contact several military officers who had participated in the operation. Major General (Retired) David W. Gray was one of those contacted.

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Vanguard of Valor: Small Unit Actions in Afghanistan

Vanguard of Valor: Small Unit Actions in Afghanistan

General Editor Donald P. Wright, PhD

222 Pages

Published: 2011

Since 2001, the US Army in Afghanistan has been conducting complex operations in a difficult, often dangerous environment. Living in isolated outposts and working under austere conditions, US Soldiers have carried out missions that require in equal parts a warrior’s courage and a diplomat’s restraint. In the larger discussions of the Afghanistan campaign, the experiences of these Soldiers—especially the young sergeants and lieutenants that lead small units—often go undocumented.

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Vanguard of Valor: Small Unit Actions in Afghanistan Volume II

Vanguard of Valor: Small Unit Actions in Afghanistan Volume II

General Editor Donald P. Wright, PhD

168 Pages

Published: 2012

Beginning in 2009, the United States and many of its NATO-ISAF partners dramatically raised their levels of effort in Afghanistan. The “Afghan Surge,” as it came to be known, was most evident in the number of additional US and allied troops that arrived in Afghanistan in 2009 and 2010. Their mission was clear: To reverse the Taliban’s momentum and deny it the ability to overthrow the government, and to strengthen the capacity of Afghanistan’s security forces and government so that they could assume lead responsibility for their nation’s future

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Weapon of Choice: ARSOF in Afghanistan

Weapon of Choice: ARSOF in Afghanistan

By Charles H. Briscoe, Richard L. Kiper, Kalev I. Sepp, James A. Schroder

438 Pages

Published: 2003

The purpose of this book is to share Army special operations soldier stories with the general American public to show them what various elements accomplished during the war to drive the Taliban from power and to destroy al-Qaeda and Taliban strongholds in Afghanistan as part of the global war on terrorism. The purpose of the book is not to resolve Army special operations doctrinal issues, to clarify or update military defi nitions, or to be the “defi nitive” history of the continuing unconventional war in Afghanistan.

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