Military Review

 

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English 2011 Archive

January-February 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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Table of Contents

2 Controlling the Beast Within: The Key to Success on 21st-Century Battlefields

Major Douglas A. Pryer, U.S. Army

Ethical behavior contributes more to mission success than battlefield technology, armored vehicles, gunnery, or weapons ranges.

13 Muddled Dawn: The Implications of the New Administration in Japan

Colonel David Hunter-Chester, U.S. Army, Retired

An expert on the bilateral military alliance with Japan examines the political climate for U.S. cooperation with Japan and its implications for the future.

23 Security, Capacity, and Literacy

Lieutenant General William B. Caldwell, IV, U.S. Army

Captain Nathan K. Finney, U.S. Army

The Army puts a full-court press on literacy training for Afghan security forces.

28 Integrated Planning: The Operations Process, Design, and the Military Decision Making Process

Colonel Wayne W. Grigsby, Jr., U.S. Army et al.

Army planning needs to use the best conceptual tools of the design methodology and the best planning tools of the Military Decision Making Process.

36 Complexity Leadership: New Conceptions for Dealing with Soldier Suicides

Robert M. Hill, Ed.D.

The Army should be a networked organization in which everyone can sense problems and fix them within his or her scope of expertise.

47 Leadership and Post Traumatic Stress Symptoms

Lieutenant Colonel Mary E. Card-Mina, U.S. Army

Leaders in every military branch and at every rank can help those suffering from post traumatic stress seek treatment.

54 Local Governance and COIN in Eastern Afghanistan 2004-2008

Robert E. Kemp

As Afghan security forces strengthen, they need strong local governments as partners for long-term stability.

64 Influence as a Measure of Success

Major Andrew J. Knight, U.S. Army

The proper metric for understanding success in Afghanistan is influence over the population.

73 Counterinsurgency in Afghanistan—Lessons Learned by a Brigade Combat Team

Colonel John M. Spiszer, U.S. Army

The commander of Task Force Duke, the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, discusses some important lessons for BCTs in the fight in Afghanistan.

80 Who Will Fulfill the Cavalry's Functions? The Neglect of Reconnaissance and Security in U.S. Army Force Structure and Doctrine

Major Keith Walters, U.S. Army

A corps Joint Task Force headquarters without a powerful organic reconnaissance and security formation will be blind and vulnerable to its adversaries.

INSIGHTS

86 Multiplying by Zero

Lieutenant Colonel Michael C. Veneri, U.S. Air Force

Our Afghanistan policies may be insurmountably antithetical to Afghan culture.

96 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

107 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

109 2011 DePuy Writing Contest Announcement

As the first commander of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), General DePuy established the organization that oversees all aspects of training professional soldiers of all ranks. The second decade of the twenty-first century brings America's Army into its tenth year of persistent conflict. As an institution, the Army must inform our political leaders and the national media as to what it truly means to be a member of the profession of arms. Anyone conducting serious research on this subject is invited to submit papers for consideration. The contest closes on Thursday, June 30, 2011.

March-April 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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2 The Coming Test of U.S. Credibility

Amitai Etzioni

How the United States responds to challenges by Iran and North Korea has strong implications for its credibility.

12 Military Theory, Strategy, and Praxis

Jacob W. Kipp, Ph.D.

Lieutenant Colonel Lester W. Grau, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

We must have a relevant theory and comprehensive strategy that goes beyond the military dimension.

23 Rebuilding Afghanistan's National Security Forces: Fighting Asymmetry with Symmetry

Major General Michael R. Boera, U.S. Air Force

Lieutenant Colonel Paul R. Birch, U.S. Air Force

Symmetry will overwhelm asymmetry in Afghanistan through professionalism and discipline.

31 Mexico: Failing State or Emerging Democracy?

Major Juan P. Nava, U.S. Army

Mexico will not fail despite serious economic challenges, increasing voter apathy, and an ongoing struggle with transnational criminal organizations.

41 A Practical Guide to Design: A Way to Think About It, and a Way to Do It

Lieutenant Colonel Celestino Perez, Jr., Ph.D., U.S. Army

The Army's approach to design offers commanders a new way to lead forces in a world of irregularities, surprises, and fleeting opportunities.

52 Beyond Reconciliation: Developing Faith, Hope, Trust, and Unity in Iraq

Major Nathan Minami, U.S. Army

Colonel David Miller, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Davey, U.S. Army

Mr. Anthony Swalhah

Creating local and regional unity movements in multiple areas across Iraq will help foster democracy.

60 Mechanized Forces in Irregular Warfare

Major Irvin Oliver, U.S. Army

Current Army doctrine, while still evolving, does not adequately address the role of armor and mechanized forces in irregular warfare.

69 Fighting to Understand: A Practical Example of Design at the Battalion Level

Lieutenant Colonel Pat Proctor, U.S. Army

The 2nd Battalion, 32nd Field Artillery Regiment's combat operations in Iraq from 2009 to 2010 offer a case study in the application of design to a real world problem.

79 How Emotional Intelligence Can Make a Difference

Gerald F. Sewell

The Army's comprehensive fitness programs must include awareness and training in emotional intelligence.

84 Change 1 to Field Manual 3-0: The Way the Army Fights Today

Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., U.S. Army

Change 1 to FM 3-0 advances the concept of mission command beyond mere philosophy to make it a catalyst for change in the Army.

INSIGHTS

89 The Way Out of Afghanistan

Bing West

America's warrior ethos is being diluted by employing counterinsurgency theory in Afghanistan; it is time to transition fully to an advisor role that can invigorate Afghan security forces.

96 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

105 From The Canterbury Tales, Geoffrey Chaucer, circa 1390.

There was a knight who traveled with us, and he was quite a worthy man. Ever since he was old enough to ride he loved chivalry, truth and honor, freedom and courtesy. He fought bravely in his master's wars, and had ridden as far and wide as anyone, in both civilized and wild countries, and he was always honored for his valor.

May-June 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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2 The Year 2011: South Korea's Resumption of Wartime Operational Control

Lieutenant Colonel James M. Minnich, U.S. Army

The United States must unencumber its forces from a peninsula-centric mission in Korea and transform the ROK-U.S. relationship into a strategic alliance for the 21st Century.

8 Maintaining the Combat Edge

Major General Michael S. Tucker, U.S. Army

Major Jason P. Conroy, U.S. Army

The Army's gains in stability and counterinsurgency skills have come at the expense of its ability to conduct major combat operations. This imbalance must be corrected before the expertise of our field grade officers and senior NCOs is lost.

17 Preparing Soldiers to Help Foreign Partners Meet 21st Century Challenges

Brigadier General Edward P. Donnelly, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Maginnis, U.S. Army, Retired

Security cooperation will play as great a role in an era of persistent conflict as deterrence did during the Cold War. The Army must integrate security cooperation into its training, doctrine, and education.

25 The Fight for the Village: Southern Afghanistan, 2010

Lieutenant Colonel Brian Petit, U.S. Army

The future of Afghanistan may not be won in the villages, but history teaches us that it will not be won without them. Here are five observations about village stability operations.

33 The Afghan Balance of Power and the Culture of Jihad

Lieutenant Colonel John J. Malevich, Canadian Army

Daryl C. Youngman, Kansas State University

Population-centric COIN has been misinterpreted as "getting them to like us," with no genuine understanding of the root causes of the Afghan insurgency.

40 Two Tours in Afghanistan: Twenty Years and Two Armies Apart

Major Eero Kinnunen, Estonian Defense Forces

Lieutenant Colonel Lester W. Grau, U.S. Army, Retired

One leader's reminiscences of his combat time in Afghanistan, serving first in the Soviet Army against the Mujahideen and then with the Estonian Army against the Taliban.

50 Neuroscience for Combat Leaders: A Brain-Based Approach to Leading on the Modern Battlefield

Major Andrew Steadman, U.S. Army

Educating soldiers about brain function and incorporating cognitive stressors into training helps them perform with emotional stability.

62 Wartime Sourcing: Building Capability and Predictability through Continuity

Lieutenant Colonel Heather Reed, U.S. Army

Continuity of unit and augmentee sourcing can benefit both the soldiers' welfare and mission effectiveness. The quality of dwell time should be considered, not merely its quantity.

70 Death from Above: UAVs and Losing Hearts and Minds

Jeffrey A. Sluka, Ph.D.

The "greatest, weirdest, coolest, hardware in the American arsenal" is probably undermining the campaign in Afghanistan.

77 Economic Violence: It's Time to Change the Game

Captain Jonathan Pan, U.S. Army

The troop surge in Afghanistan does not mean there should be a corresponding surge in financial aid.

INSIGHTS

83 An Old Man's Thoughts on War and Peace

Professor Edward Bernard Glick

We may enjoy peace, but we shall never entirely rid ourselves of war because we are "wired" to fight.

87 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

July-August 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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Table of Contents

2 Information Operations: From Good to Great

Brigadier General Ralph O. Baker, U.S. Army

The Army must ensure it executes information operations with the same degree of rigor and discipline that it employs in kinetic operations.

8 Fighting the Information War but Losing Credibility: What Can We Do?

Lieutenant Colonel Rumi Nielson-Green, U.S. Army

Attempting to make public affairs a nonlethal weapon renders it ineffective. Professional journalists will resist accepting press releases full of polemics and propaganda.

16 New Norms for the 21st Century Soldier

Lieutenant General Michael A. Vane, U.S. Army

Basic soldier skills for today's Army should include operational adaptability, cultural and language proficiency, digital literacy and space knowledge, and skills in negotiations, technical intelligence, and site exploitation.

25 The Five Fights of the Surkhagan and the Future of ISAF

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Darling, Alaska Army National Guard

The war of the flag officers is ending in Afghanistan. The war of the field grade officers approaches.

35 Seven Pillars of Small War Power

Randy Borum, Ph.D.

We may need to modify our traditional "center of gravity" analysis of insurgencies to accommodate multiple centers of gravity in an asymmetric diffusion of power.

46 What is Old is New: Countering IEDs by Disrupting the Weapon Supply

Captain Paulo Shakarian, U.S. Army

Lieutenant General Charles P. Otstott, U.S. Army, Retired

Locating and destroying weapons caches is arguably one of the most effective ways to reduce violence in an insurgency.

53 City Gods and Village Deities: The Urban Bias in Counterinsurgency Operations

Eric Jardine

Rurally based insurgencies are often more successful than those conducted in urban areas. Counterinsurgency operators must break free from their city-based focus.

62 Designing the Victory in Europe

Colonel John J. Marr, U.S. Army

The Combined Chiefs of Staff of the United States and United Kingdom applied a design-centric approach to end World War II in Europe.

69 The Turkish-American Crisis: An Analysis of 1 March 2003

Karen Kaya

Pursuing multi-track engagements with Turkey led to confusion and diplomatic stalemate in 2003. Having a clear and legitimate point of contact for international negotiations is important.

76 Haiti Disaster Relief: Logistics is the Operation

Colonel James A. Vohr, U.S. Marine Corps

Humanitarian assistance is a logistics-centric operation in which logistics as a Joint function becomes the main effort.

INSIGHTS

83 In Bed with an Elephant: Personal Observations on Coalition Operations in the Contemporary Operating Environment

General Sir Nick Parker, British Army

Fostering a common understanding makes coalitions resilient and its members feel valuable. Although they may be equals in other regards, the coalition member with the most robust capabilities should take the lead.

94 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

105 Cover 3

September-October 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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Table of Contents

2 The Military-Media Relationship: An Exercise in Strategic Patience

Colonel Steven A. Boylan, U.S. Army, Retired

To succeed, the military and the media need each other, no matter how good or strained the relationship.

12 Inside the Wire at Camp Taji: A Counterinsurgent's Experience

Latham Fell

When U.S. Forces assumed responsibility of the Taji internment facility, they found that a vigorous counterinsurgency campaign was necessary to prevent the spread of violent ideology, extremist recruitment, and physical punishments among the detainees.

20 Bringing Order to Brigade Reset

Colonel Paul C. Hastings

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas M. Zubik

Lieutenant Colonel Eric K. Little, Illinois Army National Guard

The 33rd Infantry Brigade Combat Team, Illinois Army National Guard, conducted a yearlong "reset" that emphasized four lines of effort—leading, training, maintaining, and caring.

28 Provincial Reconstruction Teams in Eastern Afghanistan: Utility as a Strategic Counterinsurgency Tool

Robert E. Kemp

Provincial reconstruction teams provide practical (and hard-won) expertise in how to conduct a counterinsurgency.

37 The Road to Reconciliation: Disarmament, Demobilization, and Reintegration

Captain Matthew Q. Rodano, New York Army National Guard

The International Security Assistance Force should include disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration in its reconciliation and information operations efforts.

44 Going Dutch: Counternarcotics Activities in the Afghan Province of Uruzgan

Eric Donkersloot, Royal Netherlands Defense Force

Sebastiaan Rietjens, Ph.D.

Christ Klep, Ph.D.

Poppy production is one of the most pressing issues in Afghanistan. The drug network is complex and far reaching, and eradication and interdiction often create more problems than they solve.

52 The 407th Brigade Support Battalion in Operation Unified Response: Expeditionary Logistics

Lieutenant Colonel Matthew P. Shatzkin, U.S. Army

Operation Unified Response validated the 407th Brigade Support Battalion's strengths while ruthlessly exposing its weaknesses.

61 Engaged Leadership: Linking the Professional Ethic and Battlefield Behaviors

Major Christopher H. Warner, U.S. Army

Colonel George (Ned) Appenzeller, U.S. Army

Engaged leadership can prevent ethical lapses and ensure soldiers hold each other accountable to high standards of conduct.

70 Transformational Leadership: William DePuy's Vision for the Army

Lieutenant Colonel Jeffrey S. Wilson, Ed.D., U.S. Army

Intellectually brilliant, morally centered William DePuy taught us that doctrine is not an end state, but a journey.

78 Aligning Means and Ends: Toward a New Way of War

Colonel Charles A. Pfaff, U.S. Army

The United States aims to impose its will in Afghanistan when it would be better off simply gaining acceptance for its interests.

85 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

100 2011 General William E. Depuy Writing Competition Winners

"Communicating the Profession of Arms to Our Civilian Leaders and the Media"

101 Cover 3

The President of the United States of America, authorized by act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded, in the name of Congress, the Medal of Honor to Staff Sergeant Leroy A. Petry, United States Army.

Profession of Arms - Special Edition

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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2 Foreword: The Profession of Arms

General Raymond T. Odierno, U.S. Army

As we look to an uncertain future, the Profession of Arms campaign is welcomed in its promise to deepen our understanding of ourselves and our sacred obligation to our Nation, our Army, and our American Soldiers.

5 Enduring Attributes of the Profession—Trust, Discipline, Fitness

General Robert W. Cone, U.S. Army

The TRADOC commander reviews the three enduring attributes of the profession.

10 The Profession of Arms and the Professional Noncommissioned Officer

Sergeant Major of the Army Raymond F. Chandler, III, U.S. Army

Noncommissioned officers remain the professional backbone of the U.S. Army.

13 The Army Ethic, Public Trust, and the Profession of Arms

Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., U.S. Army

Captain Nathan K. Finney, U.S. Army

Professions are not professions simply because they say they are. Their clients expect a rigorous ethic and competence as the basis of professional trust.

21 Intrepidity and Character Development Within the Army Profession

Don M. Snider, Ph.D.

Character development in the Army should instill "resolute fearlessness, fortitude, and endurance" in its soldiers.

25 The Army Profession of Arms

General Frederick Franks, U.S. Army, Retired

The professional military ethic is a shared understanding of the norms and values of our profession.

34 Growing Military Professionalism Across Generations

Major Edward Cox, U.S. Army

Major Kent W. Park, U.S. Army

Rachel M. Sondheimer, Ph.D.

Colonel Isaiah Wilson, III, Ph.D., U.S. Army

The Army's expert knowledge can be broadly categorized into four capacities: military-technical, moral-ethical, political-cultural, and human development. Each generation of officers approaches each of these capacities differently.

43 Commentary: Doing the Right Thing

Command Sergeant Major Anthony Mahoney, U.S. Army

There is a conflict in every human heart between the rational and the irrational.

46 The Chaplain Corps and the Profession of Arms

Chaplain (Major General) Douglas L. Carver, U.S. Army, Retired

The Profession of Arms is supported by a dedicated corps of chaplains who are also professionals.

51 Fight, Kill, Die, Buddy: Words Professional Soldiers Live By

Brigadier General Sean MacFarland, U.S. Army

What separates the military profession from all the other occupations is that soldiers are routinely prepared to kill and die.

56 Army Civilians—Professionals by Any Definition

Volney Jim Warner and Natalie Lui Duncan

Civilians support the Army as a body of professionals; they are willing to do what is necessary for the Army's success.

67 The Reflective Military Practioner: How Military Professionals Think in Action

Colonel Christopher R. Paparone, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

Colonel George E. Reed, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

Understanding the social processes at work in the Army's construction of professional knowledge can prevent inertia, ossification, and ultimately, irrelevance.

78 Leading Our Leaders

Lieutenant Colonel Tim Challans, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

When policy undermines morality, leadership must come from those ostensibly being led.

81 Controlling the Beast Within: The Key to Success on 21st-Century Battlefields

Major Douglas A. Pryer, U.S. Army

Ethical behavior contributes more to mission success than battlefield technology, armored vehicles, gunnery, or weapons ranges.

92 Becoming an Adaptive Leader

Major Harold H. Whiffen, U.S. Army

Today's Army officer must be able to recognize change and respond to it promptly and properly, as this study of a former Army star's misadventures in Iraq attests.

99 Developing NCO Leaders for the 21st Century

Master Sergeant John W. Proctor, U.S. Army

The NCO cares for, trains, and directs soldiers in peace and in war. He is the primary implementer of new doctrine.

107 War by Sebastian Junger

Emma Vialpando

110 The Fight for the High Ground by Douglas A. Pryer

Colonel Peter R. Mansoor, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

113 Cover 3

General Winfield Scott and his gray-clad regulars at the Battle of Chippewa, 5 July 1814. The Battles of Chippewa and Lundy's Lane (on 25 July 1814) during the War of 1812 were the proving grounds of a professionalized U.S. soldiery.

November-December 2011

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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Table of Contents

2 The Infantry Squad: Decisive Force Now and in the Future

Major General Robert B. Brown, U.S. Army

The U.S. Army dismounted infantry maneuver squad is today's most decisive force on the battlefield, yet it lacks access to capabilities it needs to truly synchronize the total fight.

10 A Resource Constrained Environment: A Primer to Thinking About Force Structure Change

Major Jeremy Gray, U.S. Army

Rickey Smith

Budget constraints are necessitating force structure reductions across the armed forces. To avoid weakening the Army, leaders need to work from an objective logic framework to guide informed decisions.

18 Surging Security Force Assistance in Afghanistan

Lieutenant General William B. Caldwell, IV

Derek S. Reveron

The size of the Afghan National Security Force has increased substantially and it is assuming responsibility for security.

23 Counterinsurgency Vocabulary and Strategic Success

James Thomas Snyder

Western governments and militaries lack a good vocabulary to articulate counterinsurgency strategy to the public.

29 Adaptive Leadership in the Military Decision Making Process

Lieutenant Colonel William J. Cojocar, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

Adaptive leadership is an accepted and necessary leadership practice that facilitates success in a difficult and changing environment.

35 Rhodesia's Approach to Counterinsurgency: A Preference for Killing

Marno de Boer

The Rhodesian Bush War can serve as a warning for soldiers engaged in enemy-centric "anti-terrorism" operations.

46 Soldiers All

Robert M. Hill, Ed.D.

Despite significant advances in the integration of minorities into the military, we still have more to learn and farther to go before we are an "Army of One."

49 Flight Simulation for the Brain: Why Army Officers Must Write

Major Trent J. Lythgoe, U.S. Army

If the Army wants better thinkers, it should start by educating better writers.

57 Leader Development for Coalition Partnership

Colonel Rainer Waelde, Deutche Bundeswehr

Lieutenant Colonel Robert D. Schwartzman, U.S. Army, Retired

A U.S. Army officer and a German Army officer discuss leader development and leadership training and education.

63 The 2008 Russian Cyber Campaign Against Georgia

Captain Paulo Shakarian, Ph.D., U.S. Army

Priority information requirements and cyber reconnaissance and surveillance planning should be adjusted to account for a cyber-capable enemy.

70 A More Agile Pentagon

Paul Scharre

The traditional Department of Defense acquisition process is not agile enough to adapt to a rapidly changing and uncertain future. If the military is to remain relevant, it must move fast and be more flexible.

76 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

90 ANNUAL INDEX

98 Colonel Arthur D. Simons Center Interagency Writing Competition and U.S. Army War College Strategic Landpower Essay Contest

101 Cover 3

The President of the United States of America, authorized by act of Congress, March 3, 1863, has awarded, in the name of Congress, the Medal of Honor to Staff Sergeant Leroy A. Petry, United States Army.