English 2010 Archive

January-February 2010

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

Front Cover

Table of Contents

2 Strengthening the Bridge: Building Partnership Capacity

Admiral James G. Stavridis, U.S. Navy

Colonel Bart Howard, U.S. Army

Building partnership capacity is European Command’s top priority and the centerpiece of all that it does.

7 Guiding Principles for Stability and Reconstruction: Introducing a Roadmap for Peace

Beth Cole and Emily Hsu, U.S. Institute of Peace

In October 2009, the U.S. Institute of Peace and the U.S. Army’s Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute published Guiding Principles for Stabilization and Reconstruction—the first strategic doctrine ever written for civilians engaged in stabilization and reconstruction missions.

16 Forward in Africa: USAFRICOM and the U.S. Army in Africa

Major General William B. Garrett III, U.S. Army

Colonel Stephen J. Mariano, U.S. Army

Major Adam Sanderson, U.S. Army

AFRICOM and U.S. Army Africa can deliver low-cost, sustained security engagement in Africa.

26 The European Union Military Operation in Chad and Central African Republic

Major General Boguslaw Pacek, Polish Army, Ph.D.

The European Union Force is working with the UN to help create a safer central Africa.

30 Adapting the Generating Force

Lieutenant General Michael A. Vane, U.S. Army

The Generating Force must using its knowledge advantage to “lead from the edge” with timely decisions.

41 Partner Nation Capacity Building: Setting Conditions for Success

Colonel Kenneth J. Crawford, U.S. Army

To prepare units and Soldiers for full spectrum operations in austere environments, we must nest training methodology and resources within leader development programs.

48 Integrating Economic and Social Aspects into Military Operations

Jonathan Brown

Joseph Ingram

Ayse Kudat

Michael Gillette

U.S. Army doctrine should rely more on economic and social development tools and techniques.

58 The Interagency Abroad: The New Paradigm’s Progress

Major G. J. David, U.S. Marine Corps

The time has arrived to define how we intend to apply the interagency process in conflict.

62 Interagency Operations: General Geoffrey Keyes in Austria 1947–1950

Lieutenant Colonel James Jay Carafano, U.S. Army, Retired, Ph.D.

Post-conflict operations require a guiding strategy to harmonize interagency efforts.

73 Political Advisors: Harnessing the Soft Power of Brigade Commanders

Captain Adam Scher, U.S. Army

Political advisors can help commanders exploit their soft power during kinetic conflicts.

80 Providing Security Force Assistance in an Economy of Force Battle

Colonel Anthony E. Deane, U.S. Army

The 1st Battalion, 35th Armor, Task Force Conqueror helped link the sheiks of Anbar with the government of Iraq.

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Officer in Combat
 (Adobe PDF)">The Glass Balls of the Brigade Aviation Element: The Brigade Aviation 
Officer in Combat


Major Erick “Zeke” Sweet II, U.S. Army

Brigade aviation elements work hard to integrate aviation and unmanned aerial vehicles into combat operations.

101 The Renaissance in American Strategy and the Ending of the Great Cold War

Gordon S. Barrass, CMG

New material from once secret archives, memoirs, and interviews reveals NATO achievements that helped end the Cold War.

111 Saving Military Families

Captain Gene Thomas Gomulka, U.S. Navy, Retired

The military must do more about the high divorce and suicide rates among active duty personnel and veterans.

INSIGHTS Professional Opinion and Commentary

117 Ambush and Aftermath: Contractors and Bureaucracy on the Interagency Battlefield

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Christopher, U.S. Army, Retired, Ph.D.

An ambush in Iraq shows that common sense must override bureaucratic procedures to get the job done.

123 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

131 LETTERS

Letters to the Editor

133 Cover 3

Retired Army Colonel Robert L. Howard, the only Soldier in our nation’s history to be nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor three times for three separate actions within a thirteen month period, died on 24 December.

March-April 2010

Complete Edition

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Table of Contents

2 Unleashing Design: Planning and the Art of Battle Command

Brigadier General (P) Edward C. Cardon, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Steve Leonard, U.S. Army

With the publication of the most recent edition of Field Manual (FM) 5-0, The Operations Process, our doctrine is on the cusp of the most significant change in planning methodology in more than a generation.

13 Field Manual 5-0: Exercising Command and Control in an Era of Persistent Conflict

Colonel Clinton J. Ancker, III, U.S. Army, Retired

Lieutenant Colonel Michael Flynn, U.S. Army, Retired

FM 5-0 represents a significant evolution in Army doctrine for focusing on complex environments.

20 NetWar: Winning in the Cyberelectromagnetic Dimension of "Full Spectrum Operations"

Brigadier General Huba Wass de Czege, U.S. Army, Retired

Military power today has a cyberelectromagnetic dimension. Just as other complex mission dimensions have their own logic and principles, so has this one.

33 The Maneuver Company in Afghanistan: Establishing Counterinsurgency Priorities at the District Level

Colonel Michael R. Fenzel, U.S. Army

The rural population in Afghanistan has rejected most large-scale reforms attempted by a central government. Now is the time to move to district level priorities.

45 Political Capital and Personal Interest: Understanding the Economy of Power in Defeated Countries

Lieutenant Colonel Erik Claessen, Jr., Belgian Army

Stability operations are an enigma. Success requires understanding the economy of power during an insurgency.

54 Interagency Command and Control at the Operational Level: A Challenge in Stability Operations

Kevin D. Stringer, Ph.D.

Success in stability operations requires interagency command structures and a more effective interagency culture.

63 Social Media and the Army

Chondra Perry

Social media tools encourage interaction and quickly establish communication. The Army should embrace this revolution.

68 In Defense of After Action Reviews: The Art and Science of Small Unit Coping

Major Ronald J. Whalen, U.S. Army

The Army has two distinct interventions to help Soldiers exposed to combat trauma—the “after action review” and psychological debriefings. This bifurcated approach to unit-level coping is false and counterproductive.

77 The Quiet Enemy: Defeating Corruption and Organized Crime

Brock Dahl

The military is the best resource for combating illicit activities that undermine counterinsurgency efforts.

86 Investing in Stability: The Need for Intelligence Preparation for Economic Operations

James E. Shircliffe, Jr.

In operations other than war, force is a necessary but not a sufficient instrument for mission success. A comprehensive approach to the local population’s concerns and quality of life is vital to obtaining the political gains necessary to end an insurgency.

93 Language and Culture Training: Separate Paths?

Jeff R. Watson, Ph.D.

Each branch of the U.S. military has created special centers to promote intercultural effectiveness. Language proficiency must become a necessary component of such training.

98 The Marshall Approach: The Battle Command Training Program and 21st-Century Leader Development

Colonel Richard M. Cabrey, U.S. Army

Colonel Mark E. McKnight, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel David S. Cannon, U.S. Army

Where do you find the opportunity in today’s high-tempo environment to build on existing education and develop an appreciation for the complexities of leadership at the next level of command and beyond? The Battle Command Training Program.

102 Design: How, Not Why

Major Xander Bullock, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Bruce Vitor, U.S. Army

Central to the debate over design is the integration of its philosophy and capability into military command and control practices and Army culture.

INSIGHTS Professional Opinion and Commentary

109 Lessons Learned from Vietnam

William L. Stearman, Ph.D.

Lessons learned from our Vietnam experience can help the Army in Afghanistan. However, the lessons may not be as obvious as people think.

117 Efficacy or Justice? Overturning the Ban

Lieutenant Colonel Allen Bishop, U.S. Army, Retired

Instead of crunching the numbers and doing “measures of effectiveness,” we ought to be talking about justice.

121 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

130 LETTERS

Letters to the Editor

132 Birrer-Brookes Award Winners

Sponsored by the United States Army Command and General Staff College Foundation, the Birrer-Brookes Award recognizes the author of the “most outstanding thesis” from each graduating Master of Military Art and Science degree cohort of the Command and General Staff School.

133 Cover 3

Announcing the 2010 General William E. DePuy - Combined Arms Center Writing Competition: “Building Rigor and Relevance into Home Station Training”

May-June 2010

Complete Edition

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Front Cover

Table of Contents

2 Relationships Matter: Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief in Haiti

Lieutenant General P.K. (Ken) Keen, U.S. Army

Major General Floriano Peixoto Vieira Neto, Army of Brazil

Lieutenant Colonel Charles W. Nolan, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Jennifer L. Kimmey, U.S. Army

Commander Joseph Althouse, U.S. Coast Guard

Twenty-six years after becoming friends, two general officers work together to provide relief and assistance to the earthquake stricken country of Haiti.

13 At What Cost, Intelligence? A Case Study of the Consequences of Ethical (and Unethical) Leadership

Major Douglas A. Pryer, U.S. Army

The “intelligence at any cost” mindset led some in our Army in Iraq to systemically violate the laws of war. We must prevent its reoccurrence.

29 The Operations Targeting and Effects Synchronization Process in Northern Iraq

Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., U.S. Army

Colonel Thomas P. Guthrie, U.S. Army

Major Gregory L. Boylan, U.S. Army

In January 2008, the 25th Infantry Division headquarters revised longstanding organizational thinking to adapt its structure to new demands in its next deployment.

38 The Revolution in Military Affairs: 12 Observations on an Out-of-Fashion Idea

Lieutenant Colonel Scott Stephenson, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

We should think twice about consigning the revolution in military affairs idea to the dustbin of history.

47 Medical Operations in Counterinsurgency Warfare: Desired Effects and Unintended Consequences

Lieutenant Colonel Matthew S. Rice, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Omar J. Jones, U.S. Army

Battalion and brigade combat teams should not provide diagnostic and curative medical care to civilians, except in emergencies.

58 Harnessing Information Operations’ Potential Energy

Captain Leonardo J. Flor, U.S. Army

On-scene control of information operations is vital when earning the population’s confidence.

65 Combat Advising in Iraq: Getting Your Advice Accepted

Lieutenant Colonel Thomas A. Seagrist, U.S. Army

Tenets of combat advising and measures of effectiveness help in the training of future advisors and their commanders.

73 Achieving Excellence in Small-Unit Performance

Lieutenant General Michael A.Vane, U.S. Army

Colonel Robert Toguchi, U.S. Army

We can use advances in human dimension concepts and new decisionmaking tools to obtain a significant leap in small-unit performance.

82 The Parting of the Sulawesi Sea: U.S. Strategy and Transforming the Terrorist Triangle

Charles “Ken” Comer

The Sulawesi Sea area—the Terrorist Transit Triangle—remains Pacific Command’s primary area of interest for counterterrorism.

88 Attack or Defend? Leveraging Information and Balancing Risk in Cyberspace

Colonel Dennis M. Murphy, U.S. Army, Retired

Will the Army develop an “Airland Battle” equivalent for cyberspace?

97 Information Operations as a Deterrent to Armed Conflict

Colonel Blane R. Clark, U.S. Army, Retired

Appliying information operations as a deterrent to armed conflict holds considerable promise.

105 Laboratory of Asymmetry: The 2006 Lebanon War and the Evolution of Iranian Ground Tactics

Captain Marc Lindemann, New York National Guard

As negotiations over Iran’s nuclear program continue, the United States should acknowledge the evolution of Iran’s ground tactics and have a plan to address this reality.

INSIGHTS Professional Opinion and Commentary

117 Can a Nuclear-Armed Iran Be Deterred?

Amitai Etzioni

A military option targeted to suppress Iran’s nuclear ambitions may be the best answer in the long run.

126 REVIEW ESSAY- Black Hearts: A Study in Leadership

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Christopher, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

At the vortex of Jim Frederick’s Black Hearts: One Platoon’s Decent into Madness in Iraq’s Triangle of Death (Harmony Books, New York, 2009) is a gripping account of a single incident involving some of the most despicable actions by U.S. Soldiers since the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam.

130 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

140 DePuy Writing Contest Ad

Announcing the 2010 General William E. DePuy Combined Arms Center Writing Competition: “Building Rigor and Relevance into Home Station Training”

141 Cover 3

LAND OF THE MORNING CALM

July-August 2010

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

Front Cover

Table of Contents

2 Security Force Assistance Operations: Defining the Advise and Assist Brigade

Colonel Philip Battaglia, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Curtis Taylor, U.S. Army

In security force assistance operations, the only real way to measure success is by the quality of the host nation security forces left behind.

10 Counterinsurgency and Beyond: Operationalizing the Civilian Surge

Brigadier General Stephen L. Danner, Missouri National Guard

Lieutenant Colonel North K. Charles, Missouri National Guard

Colonel Wendul G. Hagler, II, Missouri National Guard

The United States can gain an undisputed advantage in its global engagement strategy by creating a Civilian Reserve Corps—modeled after the National Guard—of civil engineers, agronomists, city planners and other experts with essential skills needed for reconstruction and development during stability operations.

19 Let’s Take the French Experience in Algeria Out of U.S. Counterinsurgency Doctrine

Geoff Demarest

What is it about the Algerian War that earns special emphasis in U.S. military instruction, or about David Galula that FM 3-24 should anoint him as a counterinsurgent guru?

25 Unit of Action: Organizing the Brigade Combat Team for Future Wars

Colonel Scott Efflandt, U.S. Army

The current unit of action BCT remains the most effective formation for the Army.

32 No Simple Solution: Regional Force Operations in Hau Nghia, Vietnam

Second Lieutenant Jesse Faugstad, U.S. Army

The experience of territorial forces in the Vietnam War provides insight for officers attempting to accomplish similar missions in Iraq and Afghanistan.


43 2003 Iraq, 1945 Germany, and 1940 France: Success and Failure in Military Occupations

Cora Sol Goldstein, Ph.D.

For a military occupation to be successful, the occupiers must have an accurate understanding of the political situation in the occupied country.

51 Unmanned Aerial Systems: Quality as well as Quantity

Captain Kyle Greenberg, U.S. Army

At the operational and tactical levels of war, commanders must emphasize the need to improve the use of unmanned aerial systems already in use in Afghanistan and Iraq.

60 A Primer on Developing Measures of Effectiveness

Major Shon McCormick, U.S. Army

Understanding measures of effectiveness, and how to create them, will remain a fundamental skill for commanders and staffs as long as the Army employs the elements of design.

67 Persistent Security, Then Development

Captain Jonathan Pan, U.S. Army

Long-term development combined with Afghan-led security is the key to transitioning the war in Afghanistan to the Afghans. Proper planning must occur throughout the process.

76 Human Terrain Team Operations in East Baghdad

Lieutenant Colonel Jonathan D. Thompson, U.S. Army

Human terrain teams help commanders understand the people, the key factor in a counterinsurgency fight.

85 Warfare by Internet: The Logic of Strategic Deterrence, Defense, and Attack

Huba Wass de Czege, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, Retired

Modern military power has many interacting dimensions. The cyberelectromagnetic dimension needs more brainpower and attention than it is getting.

97 REVIEW Essay- The Fight for the High Ground

Colonel Peter R. Mansoor, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

Most americans view U.S. Army interrogations in Iraq in 2003-2004 through the lens of Abu Ghraib. As Douglas Pryer points out in The Fight for the High Ground: The U.S. Army and Interrogation During Operation Iraqi Freedom, May 2003–April 2004 (CGSC Foundation Press, Fort Leavenworth, KS, 2009), this view is distorted and potentially dangerous.

99 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

109 Cover 3

Declaration of Independence

Ethics Reader - Special Edition

Complete Edition

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Table of Contents

3 Owning Our Army Ethic

Major Chris Case, U.S. Army

Major Bob Underwood, U.S. Army

Colonel Sean T. Hannah, Ph.D., U.S. Army

The Army's ethic must reconcile possible tensions between action and duty by providing guidance for both why we fight and how we should fight.

11 On the Road to Articulating Our Professional Ethic

Lieutenant Colonel Brian Imiola, Ph.D., U.S. Army

Major Danny Cazier, U.S. Army

Any exploration of a serviceable professional ethic must take into account the objectivity of our moral tradition.

19 Warriors, the Army Ethos, and the Sacred Trust of Soldiers

Lieutenant Colonel Peter D. Fromm, U.S. Army, Retired

We expect American Soldiers to be much more than what the term "warrior" suggests.

27 Discipline, Punishment, and Counterinsurgency

Scott Andrew Ewing

Vague regulations encourage NCOs to disguise arbitrary punishments as extra training. This ubiquitous practice may be contributing to abuse of civilians during operations. Originally published in the September-October 2008 edition of MR.

38 Competency vs. Character? It Must Be Both!

Lieutenant Colonel Joe Doty, Ph.D., U.S. Army

Major Walter Sowden, U.S. Army

The Army should abolish stand-alone ethical or character development training and embed it into all its training and education experiences. Originally published in the November-December 2009 edition of MR.

46 Moral Disengagements: When Will Good Soldiers do Bad Things?

Christopher M. Barnes, Ph.D.

Keith Leavitt, Ph.D.

When Soldiers avoid applying an ethical framework to a situation, they rationalize their conduct as a moral choice.

52 The Inclination for War Crimes

Lieutenant Colonel Robert Rielly, U.S. Army, Retired

An Army inquiry into the My Lai Massacre 36 years ago provides today's leaders with ways to determine if units are tempted to commit war crimes. Originally published in the May-June 2009 edition of MR.

59 The Embedded Morality in FM 3-24 Counterinsurgency

Lieutenant Colonel Celestino Perez, Jr., Ph.D., U.S. Army

Army doctrine tells us to respect the other's dignity and, hence, the other's life. Originally published in the May-June 2009 edition of MR.

68 Legitimacy and Military Operations

Lieutenant Colonel James W. Hammond, Canadian Forces

In America's rush to war, it forgot that legitimacy, whether real or perceived, is paramount. The author argues that to achieve success, the U.S. must conduct all military operations with legitimacy in mind. Originally published in the July-August 2008 edition of MR.

80 The Need for Discretion in Resilient Soldiering

Lieutenant Colonel (Chaplain) Robert Roetzel, U.S. Army

While Soldiers understand that discretion is essential in applying deadly force, employing it is far more difficult than most imagine.

86 Automatic Ethics: What We Take for Granted Matters

Keith Leavitt, Ph.D.

Major Walter J. Sowden, U.S. Army

Recent behavioral research suggests that many of our automatic moral assumptions might be inaccurate and possibly even harmful.

90 What Does Contemporary Science Say About Ethical Leadership?

Christopher M. Barnes, Ph.D.

Lieutenant Colonel Joe Doty, Ph.D., U.S. Army

Ethical leadership requires emphasizing the importance and significance of ethics.

94 At What Cost, Intelligence? A Case Study of the Consequences of Ethical (and Unethical) Leadership

Major Douglas A. Pryer, U.S. Army

The "intelligence at any cost" mind-set led some in our Army in Iraq to systemically violate the laws of war. We must prevent its recurrence. Originally published in the May-June 2010 edition of MR.

110 Reconnecting With Our Roots: Reflections on the Army's Ethic

Lieutenant General Robert L. Caslen, Jr., U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Erik Anderson, U.S. Army

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

BOOK REVIEW ESSAY

117 Black Hearts: A Study in Leadership

Lieutenant Colonel Paul Christopher, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

At the vortex of Jim Frederick's Black Hearts: One Platoon's Decent into Madness in Iraq's Triangle of Death (Harmony Books, New York, 2009) is a gripping account of a single incident involving some of the most despicable actions by U.S. Soldiers since the My Lai Massacre in Vietnam. Originally published in the May-June 2010 edition of MR.

121 Cover 3

Arms are instruments of ill omen, not the instruments of the gentleman. When one is compelled to use them, it is best to do so without relish. There is no glory in victory, and so to glorify it despite this is to exult in the killing of men.

September-October 2010

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

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Table of Contents

2 The Top Seven Myths of U.S. Defense Policy Toward the Americas

Frank O. Mora, Ph.D., Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Western Hemisphere Affairs

Nicholas F. Zimmerman, Special Assistant to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Western Hemisphere Affairs

Inconsistencies and fallacies plague the understanding of U.S. policy in the Americas. This article explains the rationale and purpose of U.S. defense policy in the Western Hemisphere.

11 Disarming the Key Leader Engagement

Major General Richard C. Nash

Captain Eric P. Magistad, Minnesota National Guard

When 34th Infantry Division Commander MG Richard Nash assumed command of Multi-National Division-South in southern Iraq, he initiated a key leader engagement program to inform, influence, and educate local Iraq officials. This article articulates his successful strategy for efficient and productive leader engagements.

21 Thoughts on the Battle for the Mind: IO and COIN in the Pashtun Belt

Commander Larry LeGree, U.S. Navy

A former leader of a provincial reconstruction team asserts that U.S. forces should have a persistent, nuanced, and informed information operations campaign at the center of the COIN strategy in Afghanistan.

33 National Will from a Threat Perspective

E. Margaret Phillips

U.S. adversaries consider the military a proxy target for national will. This article discusses the motivations, tactics, and techniques that could be used against the U.S. in future proxy attacks.

40 Heuristics and Biases in Military Decision Making

Major Blair S. Williams, U.S. Army

The classic Military Decision Making Process is ill-suited for the analysis of problems exhibited in current operations. The complex, ambiguous problems the Army faces today require an emergent style of decision making, where the practitioners are willing to embrace improvisation and reflection.

53 Shared Situational Understanding: Fundamental Principles and Iconoclastic Observations

Richard Stuart Maltz

Shared cultural overlays enable synchronization in warfighting, even in the absence of direct guidance and communication.

59 The Militarization of Gazprom

Lieutenant Commander Cindy Hurst, U.S. Navy Reserve

While the United States has been privatizing its military logistics, Russia is militarizing its corporate security.

68 The Allure of Quick Victory: Lessons from Peru’s Fight against Sendero Luminoso

Major Michael L. Burgoyne, U.S. Army

Peru did not effectively address social inequities after its defeat of the Shining Path in the 1990s, and the insurgency is reigniting.

74 Talking Grand Strategy

Commander John T. Kuehn, Ph.D., U.S. Navy, Retired

The war that lasted from 1914 to 1989 is over. The United States should return to the grand strategy that served it well before World War II.

79 A Practical Approach to Cultural Insight

Colonel Casey Haskins, U.S. Army

The author offers a framework for analyzing cultures, making plans, and informing decisions.

INSIGHTS

88 Now That We’re Leaving Iraq, What Did We Learn?

Colonel Craig A. Collier, U.S. Army

Our Soldiers are the most lethal on earth. Traditional combat operations worked in Iraq.

94 The Challenge of Leadership in the Interagency Environment

William J. Davis, Jr., Ph.D.

In the interagency environment, the way to accomplish the mission is to employ the “six C’s”—comprehend, coordinate, cooperate, compromise, consent, and convince.

97 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

108 2010 General William E. DePuy Writing Competition - Winners Announcement

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

109 Cover 3

Military Review salutes 100 years of Boy Scouting in America

November-December 2010

Complete Edition

The complete edition as well as all articles are in pdf format. Complete issues may have large file sizes that may take some time to download. Individual articles can be accessed by clicking on the article title below.

Front Cover

Table of Contents

2 Military Interrogation of Terror Suspects: Imaginative Does Not Have to Mean Unlawful

Lieutenant Colonel David G. Bolgiano, U.S. Air Force

Colonel L. Morgan Banks, U.S. Army

The Army should mandate a rigorous selection of military interrogators and remove unnecessary legal and administrative restrictions on interrogation techniques.

11 Measuring Economic Development in a COIN Environment

Lieutenant Colonel Nancy E. Blacker, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Charlie H. Kim, U.S. Army

Two 25th Infantry Division staff officers discuss the trials and tribulations of measuring economic progress in the midst of counterinsurgency efforts and recommend all agencies involved develop a unified plan.

19 Controlling the Human High Ground: Identifying Cultural Opportunities for Insurgency

Major Mark J. Broekhuizen, U.S. Marine Corps

Denying or limiting the opportunities for insurgents should be a primary focus for counterinsurgency planning and operations.

25 Dealing with Absolutes: Religion, the Operational Environment, and the Art of Design

Lieutenant Colonel Prisco R. Hernández, Ph.D., U.S. Army Reserve

Strategists must understand the role of religion in individual and collective human interactions to facilitate realistic operational plans.

34 Counterinsurgency in Nangarhar Province, Eastern Afghanistan, 2004-2008

Robert Kemp

A State Department foreign service officer describes how an integrated civil-military effort, in cooperation with the government of Afghanistan, conducted counterinsurgency and counternarcotics in Nangarhar Province.

43 Identifying the Center of Gravity of Afghan Mentoring

Major David H. Park, U.S. Army

We are not developing a band of insurgents as Lawrence of Arabia did. Afghans need our help in building systems to build a self-sustaining army.

51 The Criticality of Captains' Education: Now and in the Future

Colonel William M. Raymond, Jr., Ph.D., U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Keith R. Beurskens, U.S. Army, Retired

Lieutenant Colonel Steven M. Carmichael, U.S. Army, Retired

By committing the necessary resources to ensure a quality education for our captains, the Army can demonstrate its commitment to developing future leaders.

58 Toxic Leadership: Part Deux

Colonel George E. Reed, Ph.D., U.S. Army, Retired

Lieutenant Colonel Richard Olsen, D.Min., U.S. Army, Retired

In a follow-up study of a 2004 article on leadership, the authors find that many mid-grade officers believe that their previous superiors were toxic leaders.

65 Technician and Philosopher: Building the Relevance and Intellectual Capital of the Army's Information Warriors

James E. Shircliffe, Jr.

A seasoned intelligence analyst maintains that information operations officers need to have non-traditional assignments and in-country cultural immersion to be effective.

71 "Divorce Counseling": Civil Affairs Proponency under a New Support Paradigm

Captain Sean P. Walsh, U.S. Army

A Civil Affairs team leader calls for a new paradigm with dramatic changes for the Civil Affairs proponent to establish the branch as a crucial battlefield system.

79 The U.S. Army Approach to Security Force Assistance

Brigadier General Edward P. Donnelly, U.S. Army

Colonel Mike Redmond, British Army

Major Bill Torrey, U.S. Army

The Army must adapt its force management institutions to sustain security force assistance and make it as much a core competency as the ability to conduct combat operations.

85 Foreign Disaster Response: Joint Task Force-Haiti: Observations

Lieutenant General P.K. (Ken) Keen, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Matthew B. Elledge, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Charles W. Nolan, U.S. Army

Lieutenant Colonel Jennifer L. Kimmey, U.S. Army

The commander of Joint Task Force-Haiti stresses that we must use a "whole of international community" effort for successful foreign disaster relief.

INSIGHTS

97 Reintegration and Reconciliation in Afghanistan: Time to End the Conflict

Lieutenant Colonel Mark E. Johnson, U.S. Army

The Afghan government and people understand that the time has come to put an end to armed conflict and reconcile and reintegrate former insurgents.

REVIEW ESSAY

102 Sebastian Junger's War: An Unvarnished Look at Our Soldiers in Afghanistan

Emma Vialpando

105 BOOK REVIEWS

Contemporary Readings for the Military Professional

119 2010 Annual Index

129 Cover 3

Robert J. Miller distinguished himself by extraordinary acts of heroism while serving as the Weapons Sergeant in Special Forces Operational Detachment Alpha 3312, Special Operations Task Force-33, Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan during combat operations against an armed enemy in Konar Province, Afghanistan on January 25, 2008.